ROYAL ARMY DENTAL CORPS

THE WAR OFFICE. Training Notes for Clerk Orderlies of the Army Dental Corps (26, Manuals, 1388)

Her Majesty’s Stationery Office, 1940.
£75

4t0, 29 pp., with illustrations and graphs, each leaf interleaved with blanks. Bound in original paper wrappers; “(Crown Copyright Reserved)”. Pen autograph of owner on upper outer corner.

“The wastage of fit soldiers through lack of proper dental care during World War I highlighted the need for formal organisation and proper provision and the Army Dental Corps was formed on 4th January 1921. Dental Surgeons were initially granted a Short Service Commission of six years with the opportunity for selection to a permanent commission whilst servicemen joined for an initial engagement of seven years and went to the Army Dental Corps School of Instruction in Aldershot to train as Dental Mechanics or Dental Clerk Orderlies. The interwar years had been a period of growth for the ADC as they firmly established their role and position within the life of the British Army. During World War Two the ADC expanded rapidly, in numbers of serving personnel, the number of Dental Centres in the UK and in the variety of courses and training available including general anaesthesia, dental prosthetics, dental radiography and maxillo-facial.” (from the website of the Museum of Military Medicine)