MORRIS, Beverley R.

MORRIS, Beverley R.. British Game Birds and Wildfowl. Illustrated with Sixty Coloured Plates.

London, Groombridge and Sons, 1864.

£1,600

Large 4to, pp. iv, 252. With sixty impressive and fine lithographic colour plates, all finished by hand. Title-page foxed. Very occasional and light marginal spotting throughout the text. Plates bright and fresh, vivid colours with minimal spotting only to margins of some illustration. Bound in later red Russia half leather and buckram over plywood boards with bevelled edges, spine in compartments with five raised bands, blind-tooled floral centrepieces, gilt-stamped name of author and black morocco label with gilt title. Only some minor rubbing around lower outer corners and cover edges. An excellent copy.

DONOVAN, Edward

DONOVAN, Edward. The Natural History of British Shells, including Figures and Descriptions of all the Species hitherto discovered in Great Britain, systematically arranged in the Linnean Manner, with scientific and general Observations on each.

London, F. C. and J. Rivington, 1799-1803.

£1,200

FIRST EDITION. 8vo, 4 volumes (of five). With 180 beautiful engraved plates, all hand-coloured in thick paint and fine bright colours. Light occasional spotting, copiously annotated with scientific observations throughout. Bookplate on left pastedown with crest of baronets of Nova Scotia, name unidentified, scraped away. Title-page with autograph of “Mary Sparrow”, dated 1809. The work was issued in 60 parts, each with 3 plates, having descriptive text to each plate. All volumes with title-pages and alphabetical Indexes at the end. The title-pages are dated 1799 (vol.I), 1800 (vol. II), 1801 (vol. III), 1802 (vol. IV), 1803 (vol. V). Bound in contemporary full speckled brown calf over boards Rubbed on covers.

Nissen, No. 1147.

DONOVAN, Edward

DONOVAN, Edward. The Natural History of British Shells, including Figures and Descriptions of all the Species hitherto discovered in Great Britain, systematically arranged in the Linnean Manner, with scientific and general Observations on each.

London, F. C. and J. Rivington, 1800-04.

£2,500

FIRST EDITION. 8vo, 5 volumes in two (first three vols bound together). With 180 beautiful engraved plates, hand-coloured with thick paint and fine bright colours. Light occasional spotting, copiously annotated with scientific observations throughout. Left endpapers with bookplate of surgeon and physician Ernest Le Cronier Lancaster, left pastedowns with bookplate of Henry Spurr and another Crest, probably to be associated with the Rooke family, name scraped away (motto: “efflorescent cornices dum micat sol crest”). Autograph of owner “John H. Wright” to outer upper margin of title page. The work was issued in 60 parts, each with 3 plates, having descriptive text to each plate. All volumes with title-pages and alphabetical Indexes at the end. The title-pages are dated 1804 (vol.I), 1800 (vol. II), 1801 (vol. III), 1802 (vol. IV), 1803 (vol. V). Bound in near contemporary half calf with decorative rolls and marbled paper over boards, recently skilfully rebacked, with gilt red morocco label to spine. Covers slightly rubbed.

Nissen, No. 1147.

DONOVAN, Edward

SOME OF THE MOST BEAUTIFUL HAND-COLOURED ENGRAVINGS OF BRITISH FISH

DONOVAN, Edward. The Natural History of British Fishes, including scientific and general descriptions of the most interesting species, and an extensive selection of accurately finished coloured plates. Taken entirely from original drawings, purposely made from the specimens in a recent state, and for the most part whilst living.

 London, F. C. and J. Rivington, 1802-8.

£2,500

FIRST EDITION. 8vo, 4 volumes (out of 5) bound in two, 96 out of 120 total illustrations. Some occasional light spotting throughout Vol. 1 and 2; plate 30 browned, not affecting the engraving. Bound in half calf and marbled paper over boards. Gilt spine in 6 compartments. Compartment at foot with emblem of a rampant lion holding a globe between its paws. Red and green morocco labels with author, title and volume number. Tender joints, rubbing on hinges and along cover edges. Red sprinkled fore-edge. “The paint is laid on so thickly that it is frequently impossible to see the engraved lines underneath. The already rich colouring is heightened by the addition of burnished highlights, albumen overglazes and metallic paints to give an overall effect reminiscent of the work of a miniaturist. Surprisingly, these techniques were often combined to produce a very pleasing and delicate effect: the multiple ruses of the colourist triumph over the draughtsman’s numerous failures. Donovan overreached himself and died penniless.” (Dance, ‘Art of natural History’ p. 87). Edward Donovan (1768-1837) was a naturalist and the author of a number of important natural history works which stand out for their perfection of execution. He was a Fellow of the Linnaean Society and the Wernerian Natural History Society.

Nissen No. 1141; Dean I, 330.

STERNE, Laurence (FOSCOLO, Ugo, tr.)

IMPORTANT PRESENTATION COPY OF FOSCOLO’S OWN TRANSLATION OF STERNE’S SENTIMENTAL JOURNEY

STERNE, Laurence (FOSCOLO, Ugo, tr.). Viaggio sentimentale di Yorick lungo la Francia e l’Italia. Traduzione di Didimo Chierico [i.e. Ugo Foscolo]

 Pisa, dai torchi di. Gio. Rosini, 1813.

£7500

FRIST ITALIAN EDITION, 8vo, PRESENTATION COPY FROM FOSCOLO TO GIOVANNI LESSI, inscribed on half-title “A Giovanni Lessi/ Ugo Foscolo/ Candidamente Dona/ Firenze MDCCCXIII”, engraved portraits of Sterne and “Didimo Chierico” (Foscolo), uncut in nineteenth century vellum, spine gilt with red morocco title label.

Ugo Foscolo, original name Niccolò Foscolo, (1778, Zakynthos, Venetian republic [now Zákinthos, Greece]— 1827, Turnham Green, near London, England), poet and novelist whose works articulate the feelings of many Italians during the turbulent epoch of the French Revolution, the Napoleonic Wars, and the restoration of Austrian rule; they rank among the masterpieces of Italian literature. Foscolo, born of a Greek mother and a Venetian father, was educated at Spalato (now Split, Croatia) and Padua, in Italy, and moved with his family to Venice about 1793. There he moved in literary circles. In 1797 the performance of his tragedy Tieste made him famous. Foscolo’s early enthusiasm for Napoleon, proclaimed in his ode A Bonaparte liberatore (1797), quickly turned to disillusionment when Napoleon ceded Venice to Austria in the Treaty of Campo Formio (1797). Foscolo’s very popular novel Ultime lettere di Jacopo Ortis (1802) contains a bitter denunciation of that transaction and shows the author’s disgust with Italy’s social and political situation. Some critics consider this story the first modern Italian novel. When the Austrians and Russians invaded Italy in 1799, Foscolo, with other Italian patriots, joined the French side. Made a captain in the Italian division of the French army after the defense of Genoa in 1800, he had commissions in Milan, Bologna, and Florence, where he found time to involve himself in many love affairs. Finally Foscolo was sent to serve in France (1804–06). During that period he translated some classical works and Sterne’s Sentimental Journey, into Italian and wrote odes and sonnets. The dedicatee of the present copy was Foscolo’s friend Giovanni Lessi (1743–1817), a man of letters and prestigious academician, who contributed to promote Foscolo’s version of the Iliad. In 1807 Foscolo returned to Milan and established his literary reputation with Dei Sepolcri (c. 1820), a patriotic poem, written as a protest against Napoleon’s decree forbidding tomb inscriptions. In 1808 the poem won for its author the chair of Italian rhetoric at the University of Pavia. When the chair was abolished by Napoleon the next year, Foscolo moved on to Milan. The satirical references to Napoleon in his tragedy Aiace (first performed 1811) again brought suspicion on him; in 1812 he moved to Florence, where he wrote another tragedy, Ricciarda, and most of his highly acclaimed unfinished poem, Le grazie (published in fragments 1803 and 1818, in full 1822). In 1813 Foscolo returned to Milan. Napoleon fell the following year, the Austrians returned to Italy, and Foscolo, refusing to take the oath of allegiance, fled first to Switzerland and then in 1816 to England. Popular for a time in English society because he was an Italian patriot, Foscolo supported himself by teaching and writing commentaries on Dante, Boccaccio, and Petrarch for The Edinburgh Review and The Quarterly Review. He died in poverty. In 1871, with great national ceremony, his remains were moved from England and interred in the church of Santa Croce, in Florence.

[Natural History] Description de l’Égypte

MONUMENTAL AND IMPORTANT WORK ON EGYPT

Historie Naturalle, vols. 3, 1826, (Description de l’Égypte ou Recueil des observations et des recherches qui ont été faites en Égypte pendant l’expedition de l’armée française).

Paris, Imprimerie de C. L. F. Panckoucke, 1821–29.

£9500

Elephant folio (67×52 cm). 3 tomes in 3 volumes (no. 34, 35 and 36) from the monumental description of Egypt promoted by Napoleone Bonaparte during the French Campaign of Egypt (1798–1801). Plates (244 + 3 title pages): Zoology: Vol. I: Mammals (8); birds (14); Reptiles (13); Fish (27). Vol. II: Cephalopods (1); Gastropods (3); Shells (14); Annelids (5); Crustaceans (13); Arachnids (9); Myriapods (1); Orthoptera (7); Neuroptera (3); hymenoptera (20); Echinoderms (9); Zoophytes (3); Ascidians (1); Polyps (14); Algae (2). Vol. III: Botany (62); Mineralogy (15). In contemporary half red morocco binding. Title to blind tooled gilt spine, divided in 7 compartments with raised bands. Large green morocco labels at centre of front board with gilt title. Magnificent copies of the first monumental natural history of Egypt.

This Natural History in three parts belongs to the second edition of the description of Egypt, which was printed by Charles-Louis-Fleury Panckoucke in 24 8vo volumes divided in 26 books, plus 10 volumes (no. 27-37) including beautiful plates illustrating the Egyptian Antiquités, in 4 tomes, État Moderne, in 2 vols, the Histoire Naturelle, in 3 vols, and the Atlas géographique, in 1 vol.. The first edition was printed between 1809 and 1822 at the Imprimerie Royale and it was the first scientific description of Ancient and Modern Egypt. This monumental enterprise represented a milestone in the history of French governmental printing. It was coordinated by the Institut d’Égypte, established by Bonparte at Cairo and chaired by Gaspard Monge. Fourier, who wrote the introduction, in 1798 was instructed to gather the reports concerning the multiple disciplines involved. The work was the result of the collaboration of many scientists, artists and technicians who voluntarily followed Bonaparte in this incredible adventure. After the capitulation of the army under General Menou, the scientists, artists and scholars returned to France. For fear of seeing scientists publish their work individually, the government quickly created an eight-member Egyptian Commission to carry out this “great work”. The publication began in 1810; Napoleon wanted it to begin in 1809 to celebrate his first decade in power, and hence the title pages of the first volumes were backdated. The work was completed only in 1830, when the maps of Sinai, Egypt, and Palestine were finally taken out of the Dépôt de la Guerre, which, for security reasons, had so far kept under seal. Famous naturalists and illustrators contributed, such as Jacques Barraband, Pierre-Joseph Redoute, Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire and Jules-César Savigny. The quantity and accuracy of the information provided surpassed any work published before the expedition. The monuments were measured and described with remarkable precision. Even inscriptions whose mystery had not yet been understood were reproduced with great fidelity.

PINDAR, Peter [pseud. of John Wolcot]

PINDAR, Peter [pseudonym of John Wolcot]. The Works of Peter Pindar, Esq.

 London, Published by J. Walker and J. Harris, 1809.

£850

12mo, four volumes, each one with a half-title, frontispiece, engraved title page and regular title page with Peter Pindar’s portrait being on the first volume. Ms. ex libris of Sir George-William Denys, Baronet, on front endpaper of each volume. Bound in a lovely gilt-ruled straight-grain red morocco (fourth volume with some worm tracking on front cover), inner dentelles, author and title to gilt spine, marbled pastedowns, a.e.g. A lovely set in a beautiful binding.

Peter Pindar was the pen name of John Wolcot (9 May 1738 – 14 January 1819), an English satirist who found that poetry paid better than his medical profession. Indeed, though trained as a physician and practising medicine, in 1780, Wolcot went to London and began writing satires. The first objects of his attentions were the members of the Royal Academy. For the historian of the fine arts the relevant items are his Lyric and Farewell Odes to the Royal Academicians for the years 1782, 1783, 1785 and 1786 (pp. 9-133), in which the painter Benjamin West and all its other leading members are unmercifully satirised, and the opening poem in his Subjects for Painters (pp. 445-506), but the poems as a whole well repay reading, particularly those that ridicule the naturalist Sir Joseph Banks, King George III’s, and the Abyssinian traveller James Bruce. Other objects of his attack were Boswell, the biographer of Samuel Johnson, Hannah More, former bluestocking and playwright, and Bishop Porteus. Wolcot had a remarkable vein of humour and wit, which, while intensely comic to persons not involved, stung its subjects to the quick. He had likewise strong intelligence, and a power of coining effective phrases. In other kinds of composition, as in some ballads he wrote, an unexpected touch of gentleness and even tenderness appears. Among these are The Beggar Man and Lord Gregory. He died at his home in Latham Place, Somers Town, London, on 14 January 1819, and was buried in a vault in the churchyard of St Paul’s, Covent Garden.

PINDAR (HEYNE, Christian Gottlob)

PINDARUS (Heyne, Christian Gottlob, Ed.). Pindari carmina.

Oxford, Typis N. Bliss, Impensis M. Bliss, et R. Bliss, 1808.

£325

16mo, pp. (iv) 230 (ii) 138, two volumes in one. Predominantly Greek letter, some Roman. A small pocket sized edition of the works of Pindar with a short Latin commentar. It comprises the four books of Pindar’s victory odes, which are named after the Olympian, Pythian, Isthmian and Nemean games. Pindar was an Ancient Greek lyric poet from Thebes. He is one of the canonical nine lyric poets of ancient Greece. Pindar did not create any new lyrical genres, but worked with the pre-existing genres to a great success. In age-browned vellum over boards, remains of black morocco label to spine with gilt lettering. Defective vellum on the rear cover, slightly detached from upper corner. Maroon paper pastedowns. Ms. autograph on title page “Wood 1829” plus another annotation “obiit Oct. 4. 1833.” Internally, firmly bound and in good condition.

PINDAR (HEYNE, Christian Gottlob)

PINDARUS (Heyne, Christian Gottlob, Ed.). Pindari carmina.

Oxford, Typis N. Bliss, Impensis M. Bliss, et R Bliss, 1808.

£385

16mo, pp. (iv) 230 (ii) 138, two volumes in one. Predominantly Greek letter, some Roman. A small pocket sized edition of the works of Pindar with a short Latin commentary. It comprises the four books of Pindar’s victory odes, which are named after the Olympian, Pythian, Isthmian and Nemean games. Pindar was an Ancient Greek lyric poet from Thebes. He is one of the canonical nine lyric poets of ancient Greece. Pindar did not create any new lyrical genres, but worked with the pre-existing genres to a great success. Condition: In a full diced calf binding. Externally, sound with slight rubbing, particularly to the joints, front hinge is tender and fragile. Ms. exlibris annotation on front flyleaf (J. Brookman…1812) Internally, firmly bound. Pages are slightly age toned. Good condition.

ATLAS MINIMA

[Macredie, Alex (publisher)]. Atlas Minima: comprehended in 30 maps

 Edinburgh, circa 1825

£1250

Decorative title, index list and thirty engraved maps by W. Murphy (complete as list), with contemporary hand colouring, contemporary half calf with gilt decorated spine, skilfully rebacked retaining old spine, publisher’s printed label to upper board, a little bumped, 16mo Uncommon.

Only three institutional copies held. Last copy at auction, Sotheby’s 9th April 1984.